The Circle of Sound (np: K.O.D. by Tech N9ne)
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#1: The Circle of Sound (np: K.O.D. by Tech N9ne) Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Tue 26 Feb, 2008
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Spurned by the ever growing success of Bruno's reading circle (hehehe), I do propose we start a monthly album-listening thread. Unfortunately, we don't have days and days to debate and argue over an album to choose, as March 1st approaches, and Bruce Springsteen is coming to where I live on March 31st. I still haven't done his best selling album yet, and I really wanted to hear it a fair amount before going to see him in concert for the first time. Anyways, the album is: Born in the USA by Bruce Springsteen. It is one of the best selling all time, is tied with Thriller for having the most Top Ten hits (it has 7), and one of his best works.



The goal here though, is: to listen to the album in its entirety. The album was released in a specific order for a reason. Artistically, it is supposed to flow in a specific manner. You wouldn't read a book by starting at the third chapter, then moving on to the 8th, then back to the first, and likewise, for an album to be appreciated, it is best appreciated in the order the artists intended. The idea is similar to the reading circle, only much, much simpler. Pick up a copy, or, if legal, download a copy of the album, and listen to it. First, hear the music with the first few listens, and then, after a few more, pay attention to the lyrics of it.

Anyways, if you're down for this album, post here, to get a little enthusiasm going for one of the greatest albums of all time.


Last edited by Amused Himself to Death on Sun 30 Nov, 2008; edited 8 times in total

#2:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Tue 26 Feb, 2008
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I'm joining. 8D If it hits critical mass, I'll stick this topic. smile

#3:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sat 01 Mar, 2008
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For those of you who are afraid of trying the album, fearing a pro-USA propaganda work, funded by the American government, fear not. Like, the title track, Born in the USA, is actually not really a patriotic song. Here's an excerpt from the occasionally misguided wikipedia:

"The song was in part a tribute to Springsteen's buddies who had experienced the Vietnam War, some of whom did not come back; it also protests the hardships Vietnam veterans faced upon their return from the war.

The song's narrative traces the protagonist's lower-status origins, induction into the armed forces, and disaffected return back to the States. An anguished lyrical interlude is even more jolting, describing the fate of the protagonist's (literal or figurative) brother (in some recordings or live shows, the word brother is replaced with buddy):

“I had a brother at Khe Sanh
Fighting off them Viet Cong
They're still there, he's all gone
He had a woman he loved in Saigon
I got a picture of him in her arms now”

The Battle of Khe Sanh involved the North Vietnamese Army, not the National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam heard in the song lyrics. Eventually the Americans prevailed and broke the siege, only to withdraw from the outpost a couple of months later. Khe Sanh thus became one of the media symbols of the futility of the whole war effort in the States."

So I say, try out the album if you want to try something new. Bruce Springsteen is a really great artist, my favourite, one who has an amazing discography, around 10-12 amazing albums. I could go on about how, if Columbus hadn't sailed across the sea, we wouldn't have America, but I'm not in the mood for anything like that, about risks/rewards. All I am saying, is listen to this album. You will not regret it.

#4:  Author: wnvoss PostPosted: Sat 01 Mar, 2008
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I will listen as well! wink

This weekend I will be gone, camping in snow caves, but I will probably be able to start listening to it by next week. I'll listen to it as I slap myself into stopping being lazy and finish this one outstanding PM that has taken way to long to write. neutral

#5:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sun 02 Mar, 2008
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Snow caves? Wow, awesome! And all I got this weekend was blue cheese fries that nearly made me sick...hahahaha.

Anyways, I did the obligatory listen today on vinyl, which was quite excellent. The second side is really, really great. Every song on it rocks, from No Surrender to My Hometown. Dancing in the Dark is of course very catchy. I'm On Fire, on the first side is incredible, right now my favourite on it, it really is an awesome song. My listen of the first side was marred slightly though; I was going to blast it on the new speakers in the family room, so I turned it on in there real loud, but my dad started yelling at me to turn it off, because he was going to sit in there, so I was a little turned off. I expect I'll enjoy it a lot more tomorrow.

Here's the music video for Dancing in the Dark. It's pretty hilarious to watch, mostly because of the dancing, and the clothes, and the fact that the lip syncing is way off the recording of it. And yes, that is Courtney Cox, hahaha.

#6:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Sun 02 Mar, 2008
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*Bruno stickies.

I listened to some of the songs, liked them very much, so I'm buying the album this weekend (read: today) to do that thing where we turn out the lights, lie in our hammocks (grin) and enjoy. And then I'll come back with comments. ^^

#7:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 10 Mar, 2008
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Alright, I have had 10 listens on Born in the USA, and I gotta say, it's a pretty solid album. Every song on it is pretty great, upbeat and energetic. I really love singing along to Darlington County, because it makes me feel like a real drunken hick. The way Bruce sings it is pretty funny. I really like the chorus to Bobby Jean, and Downbound Train is pretty great. I'm a little tired of the title track, but that's probably because I've heard it so many times beforehand. The songs may be a little dated with the synthesizer, but hell, it's still really great music to listen to, and is very easy to like.

#8:  Author: Sakoda PostPosted: Mon 17 Mar, 2008
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question ... can another genre than rock for the next month ? ... just a question smile

#9:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 17 Mar, 2008
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What did you have in mind? What I was thinking of doing was with a week left in the month, suggest a bunch that I think would be good, and everybody else does that as well. Then we'd have a say as to which everybody has a preference for. I wouldn't mind hosting an album that I would like though, haha.

#10:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 31 Mar, 2008
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hahaha, alright, Will can comment on Born in the USA when he gets around to it, but I say we should move on to next months album.

So, we will be taking suggestions for the next 5 days for which album we should do for the next month. I have some suggestions, so here they are. Note: I haven't heard any of these albums more than once, so it's really a crapshoot.

1. Blue - Joni Mitchell

This is by far the best album on this list. It is the deepest, most emotionally powerful album, possibly of all time. This is her best album and by far her most famous. (Stealing from wikipedia): In 1979 Mitchell reflected, "The Blue album, there's hardly a dishonest note in the vocals. At that period of my life, I had no personal defenses. I felt like a cellophane wrapper on a pack of cigarettes. I felt like I had absolutely no secrets from the world and I couldn't pretend in my life to be strong. Or to be happy. But the advantage of it in the music was that there were no defenses there either."[1]

2. Jagged Little Pill - Alanis Moresette

This album was extremely popular also when it came out. It has been sold 30 million times, and features a lot of really good tunes on it. I've only heard it a few times, and I seem to remember liking it a lot. It has a fair amount of angrier songs on it if memory serves me right, which is part of the reason I want to hear it again. The rage consumes...hahaha.

3. Idlewild South - The Allman Brothers Band

I've been meaning to do this one for a while. The first time I heard it, it reminded me of Lynyrd Skynyrd, and then shelved it until warmer weather arrives, as Lynyrd Skynyrd is absolutely summer, nothing else. Well, summer is just around the bend, and I want to whip this out regardless. I think this one will prove to be a little bit more of a difficult one to listen to, seeing as the last song on the album reminded me a lot of Captain Beefheart, the most challenging artist all-time. I am saving At Fillmore East for some extremely celebratory event anyways, their very famous live album.

#11:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Fri 11 Apr, 2008
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Hmm, last night I had a dream where someone other than me posted in this thread. A shame it was only a dream. I will be doing Blue for the rest of this month, and I will be posting in here. I have only heard it once now, but I can see that I will really like it. It is much more upbeat than I expected, and much less sad. Throughout the album, there are patches of sadness, but it can be seen within the music that there are instances of happiness. It is more melancholy than anything, and is first rate music.


#12:  Author: wnvoss PostPosted: Fri 11 Apr, 2008
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:D

'Tis no longer but a dream, my friend! I really should have posted here earlier, I hope that you'll forgive me. I've listened to Born In The USA around four times now, and have come to an interesting conclusion: I'd rather listen to the songs on the album separately instead of all together. I mean -- and it's sort of funny, you've taught me to listen to music in full albums, taught me the real value of listening to every song as one -- with this album it's different. I think what got me the most is the continuous use of that characteristic drum beat in most of the songs. It's a funny thing to get annoyed with... It was usually the same beat, the "1 *drum* 3 *drum*" sort of thing. It's really noticeable in the first track, continuing to some of the next ones, and it gets to me. tounge2

And when I say "annoying", it's not that I don't like the songs on the album. Like you said, it's a solid piece of work. It's just that if given a choice, I would rather listen to a track every once and a while than all in a row. That's all. I don't really have much else to say about it because I've heard these songs my entire life: my mom likes country quite a bit, growing up in the south. Coincidently, she also likes the boss - more than a bit. grin So it goes.

I'll start listening to Blue tonight. It's funny, every time a new album starts in this thread, I'm leaving on a trip! This weekend I'm going to the Olympic Peninsula to backpack up the coast. I'll listen to the album on the drive there, maybe.

#13:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Fri 11 Apr, 2008
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Hmmm, so we agree on one thing: It can be difficult to listen to the album in it's fullness. I have trouble with it, mainly because I've heard Born in the USA (the song) so many times now, and so I struggle a bit to get a full listen on it. It's not a bad song - in fact I think it's a very good one, it just is a little annoying. And Dancing in the Dark, despite being utterly fantastic and mind-blowing as it is, is not as good as it would have been to discover it when the album came out, rather than hearing it 50 times on the radio before doing the full album. It's sort of like Full Moon Fever by Tom Petty. I've heard all of the best songs on that album, and so once I got around to hearing it, it wasn't nearly as good had I not listened to those other great songs before doing the album. Usually, when I listen to the vinyl for Born in the USA, I just skip the first half entirely and go straight on to the second side, despite the fact that I think the first half is way better than the second.

I will say though, after hearing Born in the USA 20 times, it does get easier to listen to in it's fullness. I think this is because once the songs, other than the initial great songs, are liked, then there is more incentive to hear the first half, rather than skip over it entirely.

#14:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 14 Apr, 2008
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Alright, well I was completely wrong in my initial description of Joni Mitchell's Blue. It is not really sad at all. It's actually a very happy album I find - just extremely personal from her, extremely deep into what was going through her at this particular moment of her life. Like, the only example of a somewhat sad song would be Blue, but other than that, it really is upbeat and happy for the most part. I especially like Carey and River right now, but my favourite track will probably emerge after 10 - 15 listens.

After around 6 listens, I've started to like this album - a lot. Joni Mitchell's voice has definitely grown on me, at times she can be a little over the top, but the grand majority of times it really is great to hear her sing like she does. Apparently she lost her voice somewhat because she smokes - a shame really. There is one part on the album, where she holds a high note for around 8 seconds and it's utterly incredible to hear.

#15:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Fri 09 May, 2008
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Well, another album of the month has gone by! I'm starting to think that one month for one album isn't long enough, so I think we should do one for every month and a half type thing. Anyways, in a few days, barring anything negative happening, I should be flying to Australia for 3 weeks. And so, I'm putting this on auto-pilot for a little while with a summer-esque and upbeat album, Abraxas, by Santana, one that I have already done. It is just one of those albums that most people like (unless you're like my dad and don't like vocals to any extent). It's substantial enough to enjoy it without doing anything else, and loose enough to be put on for the background sound during a party, or just having a few friends hanging around. It's quick moving, the guitar is very good, (Santana is amazing on the guitar), and I particularly dig the smoothness of the vocals within the album. Pretty suave stuff. The cover of the album is pretty cool too:



Anyways, I won't be going till Monday. I have a few thoughts on the past albums that we've done already. The thing with Born in the USA that is odd, is that I really like the album, but every time I go to put it on, I either want to skip the first half, or just skip the first song and go from there. I suppose the synth on the first song is a little overpowering.

One thing with Blue by Joni, is that it is sad, but at the same time, she is sort of breaking free of darkness and becoming positive again. Examples of this are Carey, This Flight Tonight, and A Case of You. I was wrong in my second thought of the album, because it is most definitely sad. It just wasn't the type of sad I was expecting, so I didn't really notice it as much as I thought I would. I was expecting something more like Nick Drake on Pink Moon, a somewhat of a depressed artist than a sad one.

Anyways, Abraxas is a very positive, quick moving album, and is definitely worth doing in warmer type weather. Happy listening everybody! hahahaha.

#16:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 16 Jun, 2008
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Alright! So I hope all of you enjoyed Abraxas by Santana. All none of you. *crickets*

This month, I say we get into some Bob Dylan, something sorely lacking in all of our lives. I try to listen to him every day, but it's kind of hard to remember sometimes. Sort of like some sort of vitamin, he's needed in that way. So: here we are, Planet Waves.




My brother has gone through literally all of the Bob Dylan there is up to this point, (he's waded through some *ahem*, sub-par music), and he says it's the album he has liked the most out of any Bob's of recent memory. I've heard Planet Waves around four times, and I like the thing a lot. There isn't a bad song on the album. Plus, it has Forever Young, a truly awesome piece of music that needs to be heard to be appreciated, when Bob still had the lungs to raise his voice to make the song as good as it is. The lyrics are fantastic, though somewhat sad, in my opinion, that he wishes people to be young, but it seems that everyone is still getting older in physicality and in spirit . It has Dirge, a lament for wasted love on an undeserving woman. Those are the high points on the album, but still, every song on the album is solid. The album has few weaknesses, and deserves to be listened to by anyone who likes Bob, or music in general.

#17:  Author: wnvoss PostPosted: Mon 16 Jun, 2008
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I know what you mean when you say it's hard to remember to listen to Dylan. I like the music, but it's never in the front of my mind when I think of something to listen to. I've been sporadically listening to Blood on the Tracks for the last week, but nothing serious. I'll give this album a try now. :D

#18:  Author: Lizard King PostPosted: Mon 23 Jun, 2008
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Dylan is SO hard to interpret. Nonetheless one of the greatest songwriters, if not THE greatest, of all time.

#19:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Tue 24 Jun, 2008
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Ahh. Who is to say there is something to interpret though? Perhaps what he's says in his lyrics should just be taken as face value, not looked into for hidden meanings. I think that would be the most brilliant of all possible things Dylan could've done, to create a following which thought he was saying something intricate, thought provoking, but then in fact he was just saying nothing really different at all, to create people who found their own meanings in the songs, rather than him creating a thought bubble for them to follow. Hard to say if there is anything to interpret at all.

I like the theories behind Ballad of a Thin Man, though. Some think he's making references to homosexual oral gratification, while others would disagree. Hard to really say. The only person who really knows isn't telling, so who is to say? Me? I'm just a kid from Canada.

#20:  Author: Lizard King PostPosted: Tue 24 Jun, 2008
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It's hard to know where to being with Dylan. Regardless he is a lyrical genius.

I love Desolation Row especially...

#21:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Sat 12 Jul, 2008
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dylan wouldn't want us to interpret his music..

#22:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sat 12 Jul, 2008
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I don't really understand your point. What do you mean?

#23:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Mon 14 Jul, 2008
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He didn't leave hidden messages in his lyrics, he didn't like being "labled" either.
He was constantly changing his style and behaviour and music. He played his own game.

#24:  Author: Lizard King PostPosted: Mon 14 Jul, 2008
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Yep. He was both loved and hated for it too.

#25:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Tue 15 Jul, 2008
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Like when he went electric in '65
He lost a whole legion of fans, and gained a new one

#26:  Author: Lizard King PostPosted: Tue 15 Jul, 2008
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working class hero wrote:
Like when he went electric in '65
He lost a whole legion of fans, and gained a new one


Yep. People were pissed about that.

#27:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Fri 01 Aug, 2008
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I know the thing has been out for almost a month now, but no matter. The album of this next little while will be Modern Guilt by Beck. It is short, only 33 minutes, and Beck had help producing it from Danger Mouse. I am only listening to it now for the first time, and is very interesting, in that it's different from other music. It is more electronic than his other works, but seems to be a cool think to listen to.



Happy listening folks smile

#28:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Fri 08 Aug, 2008
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Hello faithful listeners. *crickets*

Having only three listens on Modern Guilt, I can only say a few basic thoughts that I have about the album. I think it's pretty good stuff. I find the first 7 songs to be pretty solid, but feel that the album trails off a little bit after that. Walls is a pretty solid song, I like the sound the drum makes on that track. I do only have 3 listens on the thing though, it could be that the last 3 songs on the album are only challenging songs, and that I just haven't discovered how awesome they are as of yet. On Sea Change, also by Beck, I didn't like two songs on the album for about 50 listens, then I really liked them afterwards.

So basically, what I'm saying is, that it's a decent album, at least I think it may be, though I'm not sure tounge2

EDIT: Though I will say, Soul of a Man is awesome.

#29:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sun 07 Sep, 2008
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Gotta say, this is basically a practice of masturbation of sorts, but no worry, I enjoy it.

Modern Guilt was bloody great. Saw Beck in concert. As did wnvoss, and we both really loved it. Great times. Grand album, etc, etc.

Now, for this months album: That Lucky Old Sun by Brian Wilson.



Collaborating with Van Dyke Parks once again for a very positive album. It's a song cycle, with spoken word tracks in between songs. After hearing it once, I feel it's in the same vein as Smile, my favourite all time album. It's really a refreshing thing to listen to, in that it's so different from everything else that's considered "music" these days. It's sad that it probably won't even place on the charts, but then again, that helps me feel much more elitist than I already am...probably a bad thing, all things considered. Anyways, hopefully one of you listens to it. Only problem is, it can't be downloaded via torrents for some reason. If need be, I can send it if you give me your email address. Happy listening folks.

#30:  Author: wnvoss PostPosted: Sun 14 Sep, 2008
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Ah, a new album!

*wnvoss doesn't know much about Brian Wilson, and didn't know that he was still making albums.

I'll give it a try this next week and beyond, and report back. cheesy

#31:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 13 Oct, 2008
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hmmmmmmm. I'll say, I had trouble listening to that album. wasn't a favourite of mine, that's for sure. well, that's not entirely fair. i had about 4 listens of it, and i liked it twice, but i listened two more times and had subpar listens. i'll probably be back in 5 months saying how brilliant it is, but still, i don't really like it as of right now.

anywho, new album for the month! It is Ram by Paul McCartney. I've listened to this one once, and i'll tell you i really like it. it's much rockier than McCartney's first solo album, McCartney, with very little in common. the main difference between the two albums is that i actually really liked the album cover for McCartney. the album cover for Ram however nearly scared me off, almost diverging me to one of his later albums with less, ahem, "colourful" covers.



anyways, to all my canadian brethren, have a happy thanksgiving smile

#32:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Fri 28 Nov, 2008
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I love that album, I can't believe i missed this haha

I haven't listened to it in a while, so I'll give it a go later and post what I think.

#33:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Fri 28 Nov, 2008
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Oh, I'm really feeling Dear Boy It's got a real Beatles feel. Haunting.

Oh, and let's not forget Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey, brings chills remembering this song. Songs are a time capsule of feelings.

Oh, especially the "hands across the water, hands across the sky" part, and after that. Brings back a lot of memories...

#34:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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working class hero wrote:
Oh, I'm really feeling Dear Boy It's got a real Beatles feel. Haunting.
Yeah, I would agree with you on that.

I'm of the opinion that Uncle Albert should close the album, or at least the side, because it's such a strong song and it has a climatic, endish sort of feel to it.

The album is rather interesting, because it has shades of real poppy music, but then more harder rock type songs mixed in as well. Like, Uncle Albert, and then Smile Away comes up next. Monkberry Moon Delight, Ram On. I like this type of set up on an album, it makes for diversity and greater balance, and usually the album sounds a lot better because of it. Sort of reminds me of Abbey Road a little bit actually, like "She's So Heavy" with the heavy guitar to the lighter acoustic songs, like "Here Comes the Sun".

#35:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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Well put, Monkberry Moon Delight is pure solo McCartney. You could tell that he really was the driving force behind them, you could hear his musical genius in all the Beatles songs.

Funny, because I had this ava before I stumbled upon the Ram topic. kiekeboe

#36:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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working class hero wrote:
Well put, Monkberry Moon Delight is pure solo McCartney. You could tell that he really was the driving force behind them, you could hear his musical genius in all the Beatles songs.
I would agree for the later Beatles most definitely - he was the one who took the reigns and pushed the band, mainly because George and John and Ringo were wanting to leave the band and do other things. I remember reading a quote that Ringo said it wasn't "healthy" for them to remain working in the same studio together anymore. I would say that while Paul made them force two of their best albums out, he probably made the relationships so uncomfortable and forced that the band wouldn't want to return to the studio again. Maybe, MAYBE if John didn't get assassinated by that nutjob, they would've made one in the mid to late 80's. But still, Paul was the driving force in the late albums for sure. His medley at the end of Abbey Road is probably one of the greatest moments in musical history after all.

#37:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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Well put.
Yeah, he wanted to continue so bad, but in the end he just had to let it be. They all had their own things going on during that time.

#38:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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Hey everybody, I've been put in charge this month of selecting an album. Of course, i'm having trouble choosing one but I had a few come to mind. After a good listen in my own library I came up with one of my personal favorites:

The second of The Who's rock operas, Quadrophenia.


From wiki: Its story involves social, musical, and psychological happenings from an English teenage perspective, set in London and Brighton in 1964 and 1965.

I grew up listening to this album. Unfortunatly, back then, I disliked this kind of music because my dad loved it (you might be familiar with this). Anyways, the track listing is here:

Side one

1. "I Am the Sea" – 2:08
2. "The Real Me" – 3:20
3. "Quadrophenia" – 6:15
4. "Cut My Hair" – 3:46
5. "The Punk and the Godfather"[4] – 5:10

Side two

1. "I'm One" – 2:39
2. "The Dirty Jobs" – 4:30
3. "Helpless Dancer" – 2:32
4. "Is It in My Head?" – 3:46
5. "I've Had Enough" – 6:14

Side three

1. "5:15" – 5:00
2. "Sea and Sand" – 5:01
3. "Drowned" – 5:28
4. "Bell Boy" – 4:56

Side four

1. "Doctor Jimmy" – 8:42
2. "The Rock" – 6:37
3. "Love, Reign o'er Me" – 5:48

<mod>Slight edit, please remember it is not allowed to facilitate copyright infringement. dragon</mod>

Happy listening


Last edited by Scarecrow on Mon 01 Dec, 2008; edited 1 time in total

#39:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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Got the album. Just skimmed the wikipedia article on it, and then some reviews. Now I'm listening to it for the very first time.

#40:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sun 30 Nov, 2008
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Ah cool. I have this on vinyl actually, and I've listened to it a few times. I really like the thing, but it has fueled many a rant by me and my brother. For instance, Bell Boy, a decent though questionable song considering the quality of the other songs on the album, was put on the album. They put it on there so it would suit the album's concept of the story that they're telling. Without it, the album would be stronger, because let's face it, the song isn't their greatest piece of work. This frustrates me, because look at Who's Next. Who's Next is the Who's greatest album, and it succeeded because the "concept album" idea failed, and they just strung great songs together, something that they would have been much more adept at doing if they could just let the whole "rock opera" concept down for a while. I'm of the mind that sometimes the concept needs to be looser so as to avoid limiting the quality of the album. Like, on Tommy, does Tommy need to get raped by Uncle Ernie? Honestly, why was that necessary?

Good choice though tounge2

#41:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
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haha, good points tounge2

And Bruno, how do you like it so far?

I really like "I've Had Enough", the song changes three times giving it a good feel. And Doctor Jimmy is amazing. And just listen to John and Keith going crazy in 5:15, Keith's drumming sounds like a train towards the end.

Edit: What did I do that was not allowed? I forget what I wrote shutup

#42:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
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Jon wrote:
Like, on Tommy, does Tommy need to get raped by Uncle Ernie? Honestly, why was that necessary?

It's that «we're rock and roll and we're here to shock you out of your bones» mentality they had during big hundred-year-war that was the 20th century. Concept albums are not the problem, the necessity to cause an impact at all cost is. It's responsible for Pink Floyd being 4019% worse than it should be. There's just so much adult whining I can stand, and Roger Waters manages to get past that line on every single album or performance he touches.

James wrote:
And Bruno, how do you like it so far?

Not my favourite album of all times, but some really great songs! :O

I don't usually appreciate albums where I have to pay attention to the lyrics. Don't get me wrong, I'm a fairly lyrics-oriented listener. But I like to be able to get distracted. I like to come back to the song at a later time and listen to something entirely new. It's like literature, really: who can honestly say that they never skip a paragraph, jump forward to have a peek at some sentences, or at occasion simply read the last page first? Being chained to some linear order makes this album very un-rock-and-roll overall.

But the music is great. Some of these songs, wow, amazing, amazing work — everything comes together in a big, musical, orgasmic «YES!» in songs like punk & godfather, 5:15, and dr Jimmy. Great stuff!

James wrote:
Edit: What did I do that was not allowed? I forget what I wrote shutup

Probably a link to a torrent file, or a tip on how to find one.

#43:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
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Oh yeah.. that's right shy2 haha

Glad you like it, oh yeah, The Who is famous for it's big, musical, orgasmic «YES!» parts.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXYqv_FS9yk

:D

#44:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
    ----
Bruno wrote:
There's just so much adult whining I can stand, and Roger Waters manages to get past that line on every single album or performance he touches.
Agreed. I can't listen to the Wall anymore...it used to be my favourite by theres for a while, the anger of it really attracted me. But now, I'm not very angry, (or actually, more like, I'm not AS angry as I was), and basically it's just a pessimistic romp like all his other albums. Don't get me wrong, he definitely has his place. Just, it gets old after a while.

Quote:
I don't usually appreciate albums where I have to pay attention to the lyrics. Don't get me wrong, I'm a fairly lyrics-oriented listener. But I like to be able to get distracted. I like to come back to the song at a later time and listen to something entirely new. It's like literature, really: who can honestly say that they never skip a paragraph, jump forward to have a peek at some sentences, or at occasion simply read the last page first?
Hmm, this comment reminds me of an episode of the Simpsons, past the tenth season for some reason. I stopped watching it for not only because it lost what made it special, but also for this reason, that if you miss the first five minutes of an episode, you have no idea how the characters got into a specific place. Like, lets say, the episode where Homer takes up medical marijuana for his glacoma. At the start of the episode, he beats up a scarecrow that was scaring crows away, making the crows love him and follow him. Eventually, he tells them to go away, and they attack him, and the birds peck at his eyes. He then goes for drugs. See what I mean, it makes no sense.

For me, I'm more like, notice the lyrics, pay attention to the chorus and some of the lyrics somewhat, but don't really bother with them for the first 30 listens, where I decide if it still has something to offer after that.
Quote:
But the music is great. Some of these songs, wow, amazing, amazing work — everything comes together in a big, musical, orgasmic «YES!» in songs like punk & godfather, 5:15, and dr Jimmy. Great stuff!
Of course, Dr Jimmy has to mention rape. What Who album would be incomplete without a rape reference? ^^

My favourite on the album is Helpless Dancer. I really love the back and forth of it, with Pete in one speaker and Roger in the other one.

#45:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
    ----
Jon wrote:
I can't listen to the Wall anymore...it used to be my favourite by theres for a while, the anger of it really attracted me. (...) Don't get me wrong, he definitely has his place. Just, it gets old after a while.

Now here's something that feels straight out of my head! lach2 Mind stalker!

Jon wrote:
For me, I'm more like, notice the lyrics, pay attention to the chorus and some of the lyrics somewhat, but don't really bother with them for the first 30 listens, where I decide if it still has something to offer after that.

You should really ellaborate on your music appreciacion process one of these days, it sounds like you deal with music in a very particular, a very personal manner.

Jon wrote:
Of course, Dr Jimmy has to mention rape. What Who album would be incomplete without a rape reference? ^^

Which Pink Floyd album (post-Syd) doesn't mention the loss of a beloved one? lach1

Jon wrote:
My favourite on the album is Helpless Dancer. I really love the back and forth of it, with Pete in one speaker and Roger in the other one.

I hadn't paid proper attention to it the first time I listened to the album. Was probably reading something or trying to figure out where my sister was (she left without her mobile today, so I wanted to know when she was coming back etc)... Now that you mentioned, I went back to it and, well, it grew on me! This is a really cool song! —not just the call-and-response pattern you mention, lots of things are just right. Very nice. Gotta love the shivery feel the piano and guitar effects provide at different points.

#46:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
    ----
Glad you guys have taken to it, well Bruno at least. haha

Yeah, Jon, I feel the same way about The Wall, you have to be in a certain state of mind to really get into it. Along with Animals, or The Final Cut.

#47:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Mon 01 Dec, 2008
    ----
This album grows on me every time I listen to it. (I've been listening to it a lot). '73, when this album was released, punk still wasn't born, even in the US, but it's like Velvet Underground, you simply cannot ignore the whole punk thing going on full throttle in this album... mixed with, surprise of surprises, elements of prog rock! These guys were reinventing hard rock with this album, this is wild whiskey to the ears, it's like a Led Zeppelin meets Jethro Tull meets The Clash concept album.

And then there are these little reocurring musical phrases and themes, the shambling piano, the fanfaresque horns, and that leitmotif which Townshend and Daltrey sing to in Helpless Dancer. (I caught myself whistling that tune today, while buttering a toast for breakfast). This kind of things gets me really into the album, it extradicts the album to the rest of my living. I've been breathing Jimmy even when I'm not listening to this album, it makes such a strong statement that after listening to it some three times you can't get it out of your head, it changes your route and your pace for a while. (At least that's how I deal with music).

#48:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Tue 02 Dec, 2008
    ----
Cool! Never expected that, that's exactly how I feel with it. But I thought that everybody would be turned off by the reacurring "raaaiinn onn mee"

I love it in "I've had enough" at exactly 1:22 into the song, that part is actually one of my first childhood memories. That's why I chose this album.

Great!

#49:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Tue 02 Dec, 2008
    ----
James wrote:
I love it in "I've had enough" at exactly 1:22 into the song, that part is actually one of my first childhood memories. That's why I chose this album.

At the risk of going a little of topic, your comment reminded me of another song, REM's «Losing my Religion». My dad was obsessed with this song back when I was very little and we lived in the farm, and whenever we actually had to go to the town by car, he would play that album, and this song struck me really hard for some reason. Still today I don't like to listen to it next to other people, it's a somewhat personal song to me, it brings very old, dear memories.

Funny, huh? How these songs from our childhoods can, well, hunt us down for life with memories and emotions and wow. Heh.

#50:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Wed 03 Dec, 2008
    ----
Another experience of sorts to report. Because today I had Led Zeppelin's Physical Graffiti play, and as I listened to «Kashmir», it suddenly felt right to listen to Quadrophenia in a different manner. So I changed my play queue to it, and indeed, the fifteen minutes of Zeppelin had changed my mood or something... The album just felt different.

I listened the first side, but as 5:15 started playing I needed to go back from rock to jazz, so I once again tweaked my queue, adding lots of Yoko Kanno & The Seatbelts to it: two hard bops, followed by a blues, a bebop, a bunch of blues and jazz, some rock, some pop, more blues, more jazz, some more rock and then two pieces of soul music.

It was quite a sequence! And Quadrophenia really fit in. I think I'm assimilating its mood or something, I can live by it at times and not live by it at others. I've been whistling it's leitmotif every now and then these days, and sometimes I pace myself on the rhythm of one of its songs, this musical immersion has been a really nice idea. I'll definitely join the circle of sound next month! 8D

#51:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Wed 03 Dec, 2008
    ----
Quote:
You should really ellaborate on your music appreciacion process one of these days, it sounds like you deal with music in a very particular, a very personal manner.
You are most certainly correct, dear Bruno. I've been "into" music for about 5 years, that's when I stumbled in on my brothers CD collection and began to listen to his stuff. Before that, I wasn't really into it. But I really liked this - I was listening to albums in their full forms and it was great. Mainly, I listen to an album, without skipping a song or a single song on it. The first 3-5 listens are really important I find, that if you're in a bad mood during those first few listens, you aren't going to listen to the thing again. Happened to me for Jimi Hendrix's Band of Gypsies, his best selling album. Screwed me over, it's supposed to be really good. Also, first few listens I decide if I want to keep listening to it. If it gets a good rating on wikipedia, like by music guide or something, and I still don't like it, I'll listen to it about 5 more times, and if I don't like it, I can (justifiably) put it away and come back to it later when I wanna listen to it some other time. Most of the time, I don't like all of the songs on the album initially, but over time I get to like it a lot.

Usually I listen to the music to enjoy myself, so I don't pay too much attention to lyrics, and just allow myself to think when listening to it. Makes for a good backdrop as well, if I'm doing something else. If I'm really into the album, and I really like it, I'll start listening to the lyrics a lot closer to see if I can find something in it more that I can get out of it that I haven't gotten already. That's usually around 30-40 listens. By then, if an album is unoriginal or typical of the artist, or if it has little depth to its lyrics that I do pay attention, I probably won't give it too much attention and stop listening to it. Most albums I won't listen to more than 25 times.

Now, this will come off as really anal, but I've established a bunch of rules for myself that I for the most part abide by, that I've found to be what works best so I get the best possible experience when I listen to music.

1. Never do more than one album by an artist at a time. (This is VERY important, it's easy to get tired of a band if too much is taken on at once. This is how I killed Bob Marley and Led Zeppelin for myself, I just never listen to them anymore because I was doing 4 of them at a time. Plus, artists where I didn't do too many at once, I can go again if they're really good, listen and enjoy it, where I can't really do that with Led Zeppelin or Bob Marley any more).
2. Double Albums: Only do one disc at a time.
3. Never skip a song on an album (unless it's irritating, like Mother on Synchronicity, even though I actually like the song now).
4. After 30-40 listens, you may listen to single songs off of an album, though it's still frowned upon.
5. Don't do Captain Beefheart albums.
6. Patience with new albums.
7. Don't listen to the same album more than once per day. Makes you get tired of it really quick.
8. Don't do too many albums at one period. (A good number I've found to be was about 4-5 max)
9. Some albums/artists are better in certain seasons, for instance, Bruce Springsteen in the summer, and Bob Dylan in late fall/winter. Enjoy them in their right seasons, for the most part.
10. Only branch out to new genres a little at a time. Easy to get exhausted from too much new stuff at once.
11. Later on, after 20 listens, don't force an album too often. A little is fine, but not too much. Makes you get tired of it fast.

There, that's the foundation I've layed for myself. It really works well I find. At times it can be damned irritating, but it's very rewarding overall. I was going to leave it at 10, as in, the 10 Commandments, but meh, 11 isn't bad either.

#52:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Sun 07 Dec, 2008
    ----
First of all, here goes some blatant advertising.

Let's join an experiment music2
on the effects of music to dreaming!
Click here for more info→

Jon wrote:
1. Never do more than one album by an artist at a time.

I do the complete opposite! lach1 My usual routine is like, download the whole discography (disclaimer: it's legal in Brazil, please abide by your own country's law), add a beep noise between albums, listen to it end-to-end.

Jon wrote:
2. Double Albums: Only do one disc at a time.

This really depends on the nature of the album, I guess I wouldn't do that to a concept album. But most of the time, you're right, it can get tiring if you're really trying to appreciate, taste an album.

Jon wrote:
3. Never skip a song on an album (unless it's irritating, like Mother on Synchronicity, even though I actually like the song now).

Agreed.

Jon wrote:
4. After 30-40 listens, you may listen to single songs off of an album, though it's still frowned upon.

Hahaha, I have no problems with single songs or with playlists, but I guess that's because of my culture. I grew up in the countryside, most music I listened to came from custom-missed cassete tapes, in the «I mixed a tape for you» fashion, with a carefully thought set list and some funky transition effects. So I always valued songs for their value within a sequence, but not necessarily the album. A playlist can do to a song as much justice as its original album.

Jon wrote:
5. Don't do Captain Beefheart albums.

Who?

Jon wrote:
6. Patience with new albums.

True, and hard learnt.

Jon wrote:
7. Don't listen to the same album more than once per day. Makes you get tired of it really quick.

I don't have a problem with that, I can get burnt out and just prefer listening to something else, I've never gottent to the point where music actually gets annoying to me.

Jon wrote:
8. Don't do too many albums at one period. (A good number I've found to be was about 4-5 max)

Also true for playlists.

Jon wrote:
9. Some albums/artists are better in certain seasons, for instance, Bruce Springsteen in the summer, and Bob Dylan in late fall/winter. Enjoy them in their right seasons, for the most part.

Funny. I'd definitely put Springsteen on winter and Dylan on summer. Well, whatever, we get to listen to them at the same time.

Jon wrote:
10. Only branch out to new genres a little at a time. Easy to get exhausted from too much new stuff at once.

Also, if it's not something you're used to, go check a music encyclopedia (yeah, sure, wikipedia will do if you have nothing better) to learn the language. You can actually appreciate jazz a lot better if you understand how a song is split in parts and how they work; and you cannot ever appreciate hip hop without understanding what's at play there — the closest you'll get to hip hop without knowing their culture is being a crazy «yo ma, look at me, I'm from da hood» poseur.

Jon wrote:
11. Later on, after 20 listens, don't force an album too often. A little is fine, but not too much. Makes you get tired of it fast.

This tends to happen naturally for me so meh.

Nice to see your routine, I've got to put it to practise one of these days and see what happens. grin

#53:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Sun 07 Dec, 2008
    ----
Amused Himself to Death wrote:
1. Never do more than one album by an artist at a time.


Yes, I agree. Bands, or artists go through changes, and albums are always different as they progress. They always have a different feel.

Take Pink Floyd, the changes are obvious. Listen to Piper at The Gates of Dawn, then skip over to The Wall and tell me there are no differences.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
3. Never skip a song on an album (unless it's irritating, like Mother on Synchronicity, even though I actually like the song now).


I don't know man, the song was placed there for a reason. If you listen to it you might get a message that you didn't get if you skip it. This has happened to me before.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
4. After 30-40 listens, you may listen to single songs off of an album, though it's still frowned upon.


What, are you crazy? Maybe after two listens for me. That's enough time for the album's message, if any, to sink in. After that, I listen to favorite tunes. But I still go back and listen to the whole album though.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
5. Don't do Captain Beefheart albums.


I did some looking and Bruno, apparently he's some sort of artist.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
6. Patience with new albums.


Of course, although I tend to not have as much patience with The Stones as I would .. The Beatles. They were never creative with there stuff and most of their songs were filler (Stones). The only exception being Their Satanic Majesties, one of my favorite albums of all time.

But yes, patience is a good quality to have when it comes to albums.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
7. Don't listen to the same album more than once per day. Makes you get tired of it really quick.


Not for me, I can listen to some stuff all day if I feel like it. But I have to be in a certain mood to begin with to listen to a whole album.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
8. Don't do too many albums at one period. (A good number I've found to be was about 4-5 max)


Perhaps for one band, but why not listen to different bands at one time, it may even be beneficial.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
9. Some albums/artists are better in certain seasons, for instance, Bruce Springsteen in the summer, and Bob Dylan in late fall/winter. Enjoy them in their right seasons, for the most part.


Although I do find Springsteen to be a summer guy, I wouldn't restrict him to a season .

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
10. Only branch out to new genres a little at a time. Easy to get exhausted from too much new stuff at once.


I don't usually branch out to new genres, I'm a music isolationist.

Amused Himself to Death wrote:
11. Later on, after 20 listens, don't force an album too often. A little is fine, but not too much. Makes you get tired of it fast.


I would never consider "forcing an album". Like I said, if I'm in a certain mood, I'll play an album that is relative to it. The Who's by Numbers is a good one if you're angry.

I have to say I do not like your set of rules man. I mean, yes there are faux pas, like patience with an album, but you seem to have made music into a science, which is wrong!

#54:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Mon 08 Dec, 2008
    ----
Bruno wrote:
I do the complete opposite! lach1 My usual routine is like, download the whole discography (disclaimer: it's legal in Brazil, please abide by your own country's law), add a beep noise between albums, listen to it end-to-end.
I have a friend that does that actually. I suppose it comes naturally to some, like he typically likes music the first time he hears it somehow, so whatever works I suppose.

Quote:
I grew up in the countryside, most music I listened to came from custom-missed cassete tapes, in the «I mixed a tape for you» fashion, with a carefully thought set list and some funky transition effects.
Ooh, I should try that sometime. I tried that once, it sounded pretty good. It takes a while to find music that flows into each other naturally, and most of the time the artist (if the album is good enough) has already done that for you.
Bruno wrote:
Jon wrote:
5. Don't do Captain Beefheart albums.

Who?
Captain Beefheart

He's an artist that is impossible to like. He plays bad on purpose, like, a lot of flats and sharps, and is just painful and exhausting to hear. I've had a lot of patience with the guy, but it's just not working. I should give him another shot one of these days though...maybe someday I'll like his stuff.
Quote:
I don't have a problem with that, I can get burnt out and just prefer listening to something else, I've never gottent to the point where music actually gets annoying to me.
Well, I don't get tired of music, I just get tired of the artist, or the album really quick, and generally I find I get a lot more out of it by listening to it a maximum of once per day than if I were to listen to it twice per day instead. Like, Joni Mitchell's Blue, a really really good album, I listened to it twice per day for a long time, and I got burnt out from it. That was too bad, because it's really, really good.

Jon wrote:
9. Some albums/artists are better in certain seasons, for instance, Bruce Springsteen in the summer, and Bob Dylan in late fall/winter. Enjoy them in their right seasons, for the most part.
Bruno wrote:

Funny. I'd definitely put Springsteen on winter and Dylan on summer. Well, whatever, we get to listen to them at the same time.
hahaha, I play this one a bit looser than most of the other ones. If I feel like listening to something, usually I do, just I find when an artist is "out of season" per se, I don't enjoy it as much as I would if it were the "right" season.

Bruno wrote:
Also, if it's not something you're used to, go check a music encyclopedia (yeah, sure, wikipedia will do if you have nothing better) to learn the language. You can actually appreciate jazz a lot better if you understand how a song is split in parts and how they work; and you cannot ever appreciate hip hop without understanding what's at play there — the closest you'll get to hip hop without knowing their culture is being a crazy «yo ma, look at me, I'm from da hood» poseur.
Interesting. I found that with sports, like European Football or American Football, that if I knew what one team was trying to accomplish by using a particular tactic, I enjoyed it a lot more than if I was just watching it clueless. I never would have thought that this idea might carry over to music...

Bruno wrote:
Nice to see your routine, I've got to put it to practise one of these days and see what happens. grin
Hehehe, it's less of a routine and more of a code of law tounge1

Jon wrote:
3. Never skip a song on an album (unless it's irritating, like Mother on Synchronicity, even though I actually like the song now).

Working Class Hero wrote:
I don't know man, the song was placed there for a reason. If you listen to it you might get a message that you didn't get if you skip it. This has happened to me before.
Mother, by the Police Some songs are just unlistenable. Never is a strong word, which is why I used it, but there are songs which deserve to be skipped.
Jon wrote:
4. After 30-40 listens, you may listen to single songs off of an album, though it's still frowned upon.
Working Class Hero wrote:
What, are you crazy? Maybe after two listens for me. That's enough time for the album's message, if any, to sink in. After that, I listen to favorite tunes. But I still go back and listen to the whole album though.
Meh, do what you like, I'll do it mine. I get a lot more out of listening to full albums than I ever will with single songs. I find the "hits" that people tend to like upon the first listen are usually my least favourite track by the time I get around to the later stations in my listening, and that the album tracks that radio stations overlook are much better songs.

Jon wrote:
6. Patience with new albums.
Working Class Hero wrote:
Of course, although I tend to not have as much patience with The Stones as I would .. The Beatles. They were never creative with there stuff and most of their songs were filler (Stones). The only exception being Their Satanic Majesties, one of my favorite albums of all time.
Well, unless you were listening to their 80's stuff, what I am about to say is completely void, I completely understand. The Rolling Stones were very crappy in the 80's, quite frankly, they stopped trying, and they sucked. However, to brush aside Aftermath, Between the Buttons, Sticky Fingers, Beggars Banquet, Exile On Main Street and Let It Bleed as "filler" shows that you really need to listen to them more than twice to "get" them. Because Exile On Main Street is certainly not filler, neither are any of the albums that I've mentioned. All of them, at worst, are very solid works, and at best are straight up masterpieces. They may not be the Beatles, but they are certainly pretty close.

Music snobs tounge2

WCH wrote:
Not for me, I can listen to some stuff all day if I feel like it. But I have to be in a certain mood to begin with to listen to a whole album.
Fair enough, they tend to get old pretty quick that way though, for me at least.

WCH wrote:
I have to say I do not like your set of rules man. I mean, yes there are faux pas, like patience with an album, but you seem to have made music into a science, which is wrong!
What are you, one of 'em creationists! Not likin' Science? aheeh heeh heeh!

Fair enough, my style isn't to your liking. I do have it down as a science, it is true. Still, under this science of mine, I've enjoyed music more in the past 1-2 years under it than I have away from it.

But, anyway, why is this science wrong? Other than calling it that, you didn't really give any reason as to why you dislike it.

#55:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Mon 08 Dec, 2008
    ----
It's good that you like the way your doing things and that it's working for you, I wasn't challenging you. That what makes music great, it works different for everybody.

Oh, and mother, I couldn't stop laughing.

#56:  Author: DayLight PostPosted: Wed 22 Apr, 2009
    ----
can i revive this with some obscure tunes?

#57:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Wed 22 Apr, 2009
    ----
Choose an album. Torrents are legal in Brazil for another couple of months for sure (then the guys upstate vote on this bill to make it illegal, which will probably not pass on the grounds of being unconstitutional, but that's another story), we have time. siiw

#58:  Author: DayLight PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2009
    ----
well listen to this first. this is for bruno and jon

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dbpOoTEFD_g

and the album i would choose would be Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea. it is one of my favorite albums ever.



from wiki

Quote:
In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is the second studio album by American indie rock band Neutral Milk Hotel. The album was released in February 1998 in the United States on Merge Records and in May 1998 in the United Kingdom on Blue Rose Records.

Jeff Mangum moved from Athens to Denver, Colorado to prepare the bulk of the album's material with producer Robert Schneider, this time at Schneider's newly-created Pet Sounds Studio at the home of Jim McIntyre.
...
The album continues to sell well, and was the sixth-best-selling vinyl album in 2008.
...
Initial reviews of In the Aeroplane Over the Sea were mixed. A review in the College Music Journal called Aeroplane a "A true lo-fi pop landmark" and cited "Holland, 1945" as a highlight.[5] Pitchfork Media's M. Christian McDermott gave the album an 8.7 out of 10...A review by Ben Ratliff in Rolling Stone was more negative: "Unfortunately, Mangum went straight for the advanced course in aura and texture, skipping basic training in form and selfediting. [...] He sings loudly, straining the limits of an affectless voice. [...] For those not completely sold on its folk charm, Aeroplane is thin-blooded, woolgathering stuff."[7]

Jason Ankeny of Allmusic wrote, "lo-fi yet lush, impenetrable yet wholly accessible, In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is either the work of a genius or an utter crackpot, with the truth probably falling somewhere in between." Ankeny also praised Mangum's vocals as "far more emotive" than they were on On Avery Island, but criticized the lyrics as vague in meaning, saying, "While Mangum spins his words with the rapid-fire intensity of a young Dylan, the songs are far too cryptic and abstract to fully sink in — In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is undoubtedly a major statement, but just what it's saying is anyone's guess."
...
Subsequent reviews from Pitchfork and Rolling Stone were more positive; the latter gave the album four of five stars in its 2004 The New Rolling Stone Album Guide: Completely Revised and Updated 4th Edition, with reviewer Roni Sarig writing, "Mangum had put together something resembling an actual band, resulting in a far richer and more organic sound [than On Avery Island]. What's more, the songwriting had blossomed far beyond the bounds of Elephant 6 (or indie rock as a whole), with Mangum etching out timeless transcendentalist pop steeped in a century of American music (from funeral marches to driving punk)." Sarig also commended the album for its "passionate acoustic-guitar strums, irresistible melodies, and lyrics that rarely feel obtuse even when they're nonsensical."[11] Pitchfork, in a 2005 review written by Mark Richardson, gave the album a perfect score. Richardson praised the album's lyrical directness and "kaleidoscopic" musical style.[12] PopMatters named a reissue of the album one of the best of 2005, and wrote, "Aeroplane is a manifesto for a different way of making pop. To hear 'Two-Headed Boy' in 2005 is to realize that Mangum's art is simply superb songwriting. But most of the record adds an ingenious mixture of accordion, brass, organ, fuzzed-out guitars, tape, and other glorious miscellanea."[13]
...
All songs written by Jeff Mangum except where noted. Horn arrangements by Robert Schneider and Scott Spillane.

1. "The King of Carrot Flowers Pt. One" – 2:00
2. "The King of Carrot Flowers Pts. Two & Three" (Jeremy Barnes, Julian Koster, Jeff Mangum, Scott Spillane) – 3:06
3. "In the Aeroplane Over the Sea" – 3:22
4. "Two-Headed Boy" – 4:26
5. "The Fool" (Spillane) – 1:53
6. "Holland, 1945" – 3:12
7. "Communist Daughter" – 1:57
8. "Oh Comely" – 8:18
9. "Ghost" – 4:08
10. Untitled – 2:16
* On the album's liner notes, the track is identified as "10".
11. "Two-Headed Boy Pt. Two" – 5:13
...
Personnel

* Jeff Mangum – guitar, vocals, organ, floor tom, bass guitar, tape, shortwave radio, art direction
* Jeremy Barnes – drums, organ
* Scott Spillane – trumpet, flugelhorn, trombone, euphonium, horn arrangements
* Julian Koster – Wandering Genie organ, singing saw, bowed banjo, accordion, white noise
* Robert Schneider – home organ, air organ, bass, backing vocals, piano, horn arrangements
* Laura Carter – zanzithophone
* Rick Benjamin – trombone
* Merisa Bissinger – saxophone, flugelhorn
* James Guyatt - Percussion
* Michelle Anderson – Uilleann pipes
* Chris Bilheimer – art direction
* Brian Dewan – illustrations


Pitchfork review of the 2005 reissue

Quote:


So, then, seven years later Domino reissues In the Aeroplane Over the Sea and the arguments can begin anew. I've talked about this album with a lot of people, including Pitchfork readers and music writers, and while it is loved in the indie world like few others, a small but still significant number despise it. Aeroplane doesn't have the near-consensus of top-shelf 90s rock artifacts like, say, Loveless, OK Computer, or Slanted and Enchanted. These records are varied, of course, different in many ways. But in one key respect Aeroplane stands apart: This album is not cool.

Shortly after the release of In the Aeroplane Over the Sea, Puncture magazine had a cover story on Neutral Milk Hotel. In it Mangum told of the influence on the record of Anne Frank's The Diary of a Young Girl. He explained that shortly after releasing On Avery Island he read the book for the first time, and found himself completely overwhelmed with sadness and grief. Back in 1998 this admission made my jaw drop. What the hell? A guy in a rock band saying he was emotionally devastated by a book everyone else in America read for a middle-school assignment? I felt embarrassed for him at first, but then, the more I thought about it and the more I heard the record, I was awed. Mangum's honesty on this point, translated directly to his music, turned out to be a source of great power.

In the Aeroplane Over the Sea is a personal album but not in the way you expect. It's not biography. It's a record of images, associations, and threads; no single word describes it so well as the beautiful and overused "kaleidoscope." It has the cracked logic of a dream, beginning with "King of Carrot Flowers Part 1". The easiest song on the record to like on first listen, it quietly introduces the listener to the to the album's world, Mangum singing in a muted voice closer to where he left off with the more restrained On Avery Island (through most of Aeroplane he sounds like he's running out of time and struggling to get everything said). The first four words are so important: "When you were young..." Like every perceptive artist trafficking in memory, Mangum knows dark surrealism to be the language of childhood. At a certain age the leap from kitchen utensils jammed into dad's shoulder to feet encircled by holy rattlesnakes is nothing. A cock of the head; a squint, maybe.

Inside this dream it all begins in the body. Moments of trauma, joy, shame-- here they're all experienced first as physical sensation. A flash of awkward intimacy is recalled as "now how I remember you/ how I would push my fingers through your mouth/ to make those muscles move." Sometimes I hear this line and chuckle. I think of Steve Martin in The Jerk, licking Bernadette Peters' entire face as a sign of affection. Mangum here reflects the age when biological drives outpace the knowledge of what to do with them, a time you're seeing sex in everything ("semen stains the mountaintops") or that sex can be awkward and unintentionally painful ("fingers in the notches of your spine" is not what one usually hopes for in the dark). Obsessed as it is with the textures of the flesh and the physical self as an emotional antenna, listening to Aeroplane sometimes seems to involve more than just your ears.

Then there's the record's disorienting relationship to time. The instrumentation seems plucked randomly from different years in the 20th century: singing saws, Salvation Army horn arrangements, banjo, accordion, pipes. Lyrical references to technology are hard to fix. Anne Frank's lifespan from 1929 to 1945 is perhaps the record's historical center, but the perspective jumps back and forth over centuries, with images and figures sucked from their own age and squirted out somewhere else. When "The King of Carrot Flowers Part 3" mentions "a synthetic flying machine" our minds leap to something like Leonardo da Vinci's 15th Century drawings of his helicopter prototype. The image in "Two-Headed Boy" of a mutant child trapped in a jar of formaldehyde is pulled from Dr. Moreau's industrial age island. The radio play powered by pre-electric pulleys and weights, the nuclear holocaust in the title track. What's it all about? Mangum offers an explanation for these jarring leaps in a line about Anne Frank in "Oh Comely," where he sings, "I know they buried her body with others/ her sister and mother and 500 families/ and will she remember me 50 years later/ I wished I could save her in some sort of time machine." If you can move through time, see, nothing ever really dies.

Seven years it's been, and whether Mangum has had personal trouble or somehow lost his way with music, it's not unreasonable to think that we've heard the last from Neutral Milk Hotel. I hope he does, but he may never pick up the guitar he set down after "Two-Headed Boy Part Two." Even so, we have this album and another very good one, and that to me is serious riches. Amazing to think how it started, how at the core of it all was guts. I keep thinking of "It's Alright Ma, I'm Only Bleeding," and one of Dylan's truest lines: "If my thought-dreams could be seen/ They'd probably put my head in a guillotine." Aeroplane is what happens when you have that knowledge and still take the risk.

— Mark Richardson, September 26, 2005

#59:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2009
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Ahh some good ol' fashioned ld4all elitism, alive and well!

#60:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2009
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Daniel. When I think I've seen weird music, you bring me, you always bring it to a whole new level. I'm in.

#61:  Author: Swanky1 PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2009
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wow i'm glad to see other people like Neutral Milk Hotel.
i love them so, turn3
check out some of these bands:
The Decemberists
Brand New
Minus the Bear
Emery
Copeland (not the pianist, the band)
if you guys ever want something fresh to listen to just PM me w/ your interests, im sure i can find something

garret

#62:  Author: DayLight PostPosted: Thu 23 Apr, 2009
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i wouldnt call neutral milk hotel elitist...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDP0rlg56Uk&feature=Pl ayList&p=13BF4211EA0F8 4EF&index=16

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLmYAJns5SE&feature=Pl ayList&p=13BF4211EA0F8 4EF&index=21

#63:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Sat 25 Apr, 2009
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Daniel wrote:
i wouldnt call neutral milk hotel elitist...

Well, it's not like it's folk, pop or something otherwise widespread, right? But yeah, you're right, "elitist" is quite too strong and to specific, I don't think it applies to NMH. What were you thinking, James? (Grab by the shoulders, shake, yell and slap in the face: what were you thinking! lach1). What did you mean?

#64:  Author: Sonia PostPosted: Sat 25 Apr, 2009
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jeez, I wish I'd known about this topic sooner!

it would be neat to check out loads of albums, to expand my musical spectrum, although I may not get around to it

#65:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sat 25 Apr, 2009
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Just got the album. Really cool to listen to, which is surprising because it was first listen...some of these folk albums take a while to get into. Groovy choice man.

#66:  Author: DayLight PostPosted: Sun 26 Apr, 2009
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(click to enlarge)

Quote:
Jeff Mangum, along with high-school friends Will Cullen Hart and Bill Doss, formed The Olivia Tremor Control, with Mangum appearing on their first release, the California Demise 7".

Prior to recording for friends under the NMH moniker, Mangum recorded a few cassettes under the name Milk; the most well-known of these tapes was called Pygmie Barn in E Minor.[6] These are the earliest known recordings that Mangum initiated and executed himself. There were only an estimated dozen or so copies ever made of this tape, none of which has been made public. It was revealed circa 2006 on the Elephant 6 online forums that another tape under said name, entitled Beauty, was released, along with several recordings under the name Rubby Bulbs (also a song dating from that era, perhaps the only Milk song to be played by Neutral Milk Hotel).

Neutral Milk Hotel began simply as a recording project for Mangum, in the early 1990s. He produced several demo cassettes, among them 1991's Invent Yourself a Shortcake, 1992's Beauty (not to be confused with the earlier cassette), and 1993's Hype City Soundtrack, along with two more from this period, seemingly unnamed. Although easily found on the Internet, these demos capture the project at a very embryonic stage: songs are played in between various sound collages and tape experiments, one of which consists only of a six minute conversation between Mangum and Hart. Another track, "Digestion Machine", features a varied collage of voices answering the question asked by Mangum, "What does the digestion machine mean to you?" The more accessible "Synthetic Flying Machine", also titled "Up and Over", later became "The King of Carrot Flowers Pt. 3" on In the Aeroplane Over the Sea.

During this period, Mangum was wandering the country, staying in the closets of friends, and in a state of perpetual unemployment. It was in these circumstances that the band's first formal releases took shape. Strictly speaking, however, the 'band' usually consisted of Mangum and whoever else was present at the time. This is obvious on Neutral Milk Hotel's first release, a 7" record entitled Everything Is, recorded when Mangum was spending time in Seattle, Washington, released on Cher Doll Records in 1994.


i'll write some things about specific songs later...but as a whole this album is one of my favorite albums. the sounds are so hauntingly beautiful...

magnum's lyrics combined with his amazing emotional yowling some call singing, creates wrenching, lovely things inside of me.

Quote:
And this is the room
One afternoon I knew I could love you
And from above you how I sank into your soul
Into that secret place where no one dares to go


whenever i hear this line and TRULY LISTEN, i feel like i am atop the greatest lover ive ever known, about to crash into her body and bury my face in her hair...its not sexual either, its a very loving thing. like ive met the person i want to spend my whole life with.

Quote:
How the notes all bend and reach above the trees


this line, when combined with the awesome bending of the musical saw, makes the line real. there is nothing better to describe that feeling other than i feel like a majestic conifer, stretching and bending into the sky, like something you would see on a psychedelic trip.

Quote:
Two headed boy
With pulleys and weights
Creating a radio played just for two
In the parlor witha moon across her face
And through the music he sweetly displays
Silver speakers that sparkle all day
Made for his lover who's floating and choking with her hands across her face
And in the dark we will take off our clothes
And they'll be placing fingers through the notches in your spine


i cant help but cry at this verse. this guy, creating a "radio played just for two" reminds me of my affinity for introducing girls im interested in to new music...creating these emotional atmospheres out of music, telling her things through it.

Quote:
Daddy please hear this song that I sing
In your heart there's a spark that just screams
For a lover to bring a child to your chest that could lay as you sleep
And love all you have left like your boy used to be
Long ago wrapped in sheets warm and wet


ive never wanted a child so badly in all my life

Quote:
Brother see we are one in the same
And you left with your head filled with flames
And you watched as your brains fell out through your teeth
Push the pieces in place
Make your smile sweet to see
Don't you take this away
I'm still wanting my face on your cheek


an amazing example of jeff magnum's cryptic and surreal writing

Quote:
And when we break we'll wait for our miracle
God is a place where some holy spectacle lies
And when we break we'll wait for our miracle
God is a place you will wait for the rest of your life


oh...my...god...so amazing

#67:  Author: moogle PostPosted: Sun 26 Apr, 2009
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well there's a first time for everything ....

*moogle tiptoes into the topic

But I will probably just listen to the music and also read all your thoughts on it.
I LIKE what I have heard so far from neutral milk hotel music2

#68:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Wed 06 May, 2009
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man, great choice for an album, it's so great to listen to. last night when i was listening to it, i felt it kind of reminded me of the Flaming Lips' Soft Bulletin in the way the singer pronounces the words and the musical sound as well. Kind of trippy.

#69:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Wed 06 May, 2009
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Soft Bulletin --- I knew I had something in my library that matched this album perfectly. Great thinking, Jon!

#70:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Wed 03 Jun, 2009
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Here's an idea for June: Da Lama ao Caos [From Mud to Chaos], 1994 album by Brazilian band Chico Science & Nação Zumbi. They come from a movement called mangue bit (after mangue trees and the bit), so I'll start by citing a line from the mangue bit manifesto (called "Caranguejos com cérebro", Crabs with Brains):
    Halfway through 1991, a research and production nucleus for pop ideas was born all over the city of Pernambuco. The point was to engender an energetic circuit so as to connect the good vibes from the mangroves with the world net of pop concept circulation. Icon image: a satellite dish sticking out of the mud. Or a crab re-mixing Kraftwerk's Anthena in the computer.
A legal stream of the whole album is available, you can click individual song names to hear them, or the last row (which reads "OUVIR TODAS AS MÚSICAS") to listen to the whole album through. For the test-drive prone fellows, I recommend having a taste of the second track ("Rios, pontes e overdrives"), whose lyrics I provide, original and translated, under the cuts.

Rios, pontes e overdrives wrote:
Click here to see the hidden message (It might contain spoilers)

Rios, pontes e overdrives (translation) wrote:
Click here to see the hidden message (It might contain spoilers)

#71:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Thu 04 Jun, 2009
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Alright! Im in Paris right now, so im a little overwhelmed by things, like rudeness for instance, but whatever. I will give you some brief thoughts on Neutral Milk Hotel.

All i can say is WOW. SO GOOD. Like seriously, the musical depth on this album is above and beyond. And the diverse sounds. One song is slow, purely acoustic guitar, others are accented with trumpets and trombones, and further still, accordian and bag pipes. This album reminds me a bit of what DayLight recommended to me a while back, Song Cycle by Van Dyke Parks, just for that reason, the constrasts of different instruments, and the placing of additional instruments in the middle of songs for emphasis and a bit of surprise. It's a shame these guys only made two albums.

Initial thoughts of the album was that the guy, Magnum, had a somewhat odd voice and was hard to take seriously. But the more i've listened to it the more i like it. I've been very impressed with it. It's become one of those albums where i look forward to listening to all day, sort of how i pretty much need to listen to For the Roses by Joni Mitchell to make a day complete. Every once and a while i listen to either of these in bed at night and i fall asleep in the middle of it.

I read up on the album on wikipedia, i think DayLight already posted this, but Comely is pretty much about Anne Frank. It's interesting to listen to the song while thinking about this, because it seems to fit. I'd support this with evidence, but i have to get up at 6am and so i wont tounge2 But today i did pick up Anne Frank's diary, so i guess i'll be able to compare her life and the song.

Comely is the song that i'm having the most trouble with right now. it's a great song, it's just a bit challenging, and perhaps harder to listen to than the rest of the songs on the album.

i have no real way to get the album for this months' circle of sound, so i'll most likely be silent for the most part for a while. cheers folks, happy listening.

#72:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Thu 04 Jun, 2009
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Jon wrote:
i have no real way to get the album for this months' circle of sound, so i'll most likely be silent for the most part for a while. cheers folks, happy listening.

Here's a legal stream of it. You click individual song names to hear them in a pop-up window; or you click on the last row ("OUVIR TODAS AS MÚSICAS") to listen to the whole shebang. It works even on linux. :-)

#73:  Author: DayLight PostPosted: Mon 15 Jun, 2009
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lol

ill check the album out tonight bruno!

#74:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Fri 01 Jan, 2010
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Let's kickstart 2010 with some rock music so good it makes your eyes go teary.

The Rolling Stones - Exile on Main St.


Here's the track listing; links to the songs in side one a courtesy of the house.
    Side one
  1. Rocks Off
  2. Rip This Joint
  3. Shake Your Hips
  4. Casino Boogie
  5. Tumbling Dice

    Side two
  6. Sweet Virginia
  7. Torn and Frayed
  8. Sweet Black Angel
  9. Loving Cup

    Side three
  10. Happy
  11. Turd on the Run
  12. Ventilator Blues
  13. I Just Want to See His Face
  14. Let It Loose

    Side four
  15. All Down the Line
  16. Stop Breaking Down
  17. Shine a Light
  18. Soul Survivor
Listen to it, it ranks as my absolutely favourite rock music album — depending on the day, my favourite album of all.

#75:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Sun 03 Jan, 2010
    ----
Plug in, flush out.

The album that was recorded in a Gestapo headquarters!

Not my favorite Stones album, that title belongs to Sticky Fingers. But all the Taylor Era albums are up there.

Keith Richards was deepest in his addiction during this recording.

This album is good because it's so "Patchwork", it is, afterall, mostly an album of outtakes.

It's a layed back album. In a good way.

#76:  Author: DayLight PostPosted: Tue 18 May, 2010
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http://www.archive.org/details/gd68-09-02.sbd.miller. 22095.sbeok.shnf

anyone wanna listen to some jaaaaaaaams, maaaaan?

grin

Cryptical Envelopment > Drums > The Other One > Cryptical Envelopment is a high point. beautiful and furious!

#77:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Thu 03 Jun, 2010
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DayLight wrote:
http://www.archive.org/details/gd68-09-02.sbd.miller. 22095.sbeok.shnf

anyone wanna listen to some jaaaaaaaams, maaaaan?

grin

Cryptical Envelopment > Drums > The Other One > Cryptical Envelopment is a high point. beautiful and furious!
I'd be down for something. How bout this one: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grateful_Dead_%28album%2 9 ?

#78:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Thu 03 Jun, 2010
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Oo, Grateful Dead.

I haven't heard that album yet. No Ripples, how unfortunate.

#79:  Author: Scarecrow PostPosted: Wed 03 Nov, 2010
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Tonight I felt like listening to Quadrophenia, and I remembered having chosen the album for The Circle of Sound, some two years ago. Well, it's been a long time since anyone has done one of these, so I thought I'd post one of my all-time favorites:

Strange Days
By: The Doors




Released during the Summer of Love, in 1967, the psychedelic Srange Days was the second studio album to be released by The Doors. Even though at the time it had sold quite poorly, it is often regarded as their best album.

My favorite song on the album is the eleven minute long closing track "When the Music's Over", followed by the cool "I Can't See Your Face in My Mind", and finally, "Moonlight Drive". All in all, it's a very groovy album that will have you dancing like a flower child from start to finish.

Side one
Strange Days – 3:11
You're Lost Little Girl – 3:03
Love Me Two Times – 3:18
Unhappy Girl – 2:02
Horse Latitudes – 1:37
Moonlight Drive – 3:05

Side two
People Are Strange – 2:13
My Eyes Have Seen You – 2:32
I Can't See Your Face in My Mind – 3:26
When the Music's Over – 10:58

Enjoy.

#80:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Thu 04 Nov, 2010
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Dang it, now I've good music stuck in my head for lifetime. And I even had an idea for an album of the month. Ah well, December.

#81:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Fri 05 Nov, 2010
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Hmm...I haven't listened to this one for a while. A couple years at least. Same with their debut. Personally I'm more of a debut guy, but this is a quality album too. I'm a big fan of the song with the keyboard...oh wait, that's every song by them! Yeah I'll re-acquire this one, legally of course siiw and give it another whirl. I really like My Eyes Have Seen You, and People Are Strange and When the Music's Over.

#82:  Author: Amused Himself to Death PostPosted: Sat 20 Nov, 2010
    ----
*crickets*

I had my first listen today...it was a bit rough. I feel there isn't much depth to this album, it feels superficial musically and lyrically. I don't mean to damper anybodies enthusiasm, I just think this album isn't the greatest the Doors made by any means. It just sounds kind of hollow.

#83:  Author: Lucidity_Master PostPosted: Sat 26 Feb, 2011
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<mod>This album contains a reasonable amount of explicit language, edgy imagery and, God forbid, socially relevant issues. Listener's discretion advised, specially if that's not quite their thing. Myself, I'm definitely going to listen to this at work over the week. oh maan</mod>

K.O.D.

Tech N9ne



Well, no one had done anything with this in a while so I thought I'd go ahead and post something. Why this album? The short answer is that is the album that is responsible for getting me to a point where I could tolerate and listen to rap.

All in all this is an excellent album. It has excellent depth lyrically, and really expresses the darkness and struggles that Tech was going through at the time. As far as the actual vocals go, lets just say Tech N9ne is one of the best, if not the best, in the game. The diversity is incredible; one minute it's machine gun like speed raps with perfect enunciation, the next a slow smooth rhythm dripping with emotion, blink again and its excellent jazz singing.

All in all I enjoyed this album because of the overall depth, and the diversity of styles. Tech N9ne really can do just about everything, and it makes for a really fun listen.

While most of the songs on the album are excellent songs, there are definitely a few that are just party songs. They are fun if that's what you are looking for, but generally don't have much lyrical substance or depth to them.

Highlights include; Show me a God, Demons, Blackened the Sun, It was An Accident, Shadows on the Road, Low, and K.O.D.

Tracklist
1. Show Me a God - 3:41
2. The Warning (Skit) - 0:31
3.Demons ( Feat Three 6 Mafia ) - 5:21
4. Blackened The Sun - 4:24
5. Strange Music Box Ft. Krizz Kaliko And Brotha Lynch Hung - 4:09
6. Sundae (Skit) - 0:44
7. Check Yo Temperature Ft. Sundae And T-Nutty - 4:30
8. B. Boy Ft. Big Scoob, Kutt Calhoun, Skatterman And Bumpy Knuckles - 5:27
9. Hunterish Ft. Irv Da Phenom And Krizz Kaliko - 3:45
10. The Pick Up (Skit) - 1:13
11. In The Trunk - 4:23
12. Pinocchiho - 2:08
13. Horns Ft. Prozak And King Gordy - 3:57
14. Interview with Jason Whitlock (Skit) - 2:06
15. It Was An Accident Ft. Alan Wayne - 3:42
16. Shadows On The Road - 3:26
17. Low - 3:31
18. Messages (Skit) - 1:36
19. Killing You - 3:34
20. Leave Me Alone - 3:50
21. Prayer By Brother K.T. (Skit) - 0:40
22. K.O.D (Introducing Mackenzie O'Guin) - 5:12
23. The Martini Ft. Krizz Kaliko - 5:28

Warning: This album gets very explicit at times. If thats a major turnoff for you in music I wouldn't recommend K.O.D.

#84:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Sun 27 Feb, 2011
    ----
Oh I'm definitely going to listen to this at work this week. ^^

#85:  Author: Bruno PostPosted: Mon 28 Feb, 2011
    ----
Album lyrics here, if you click song name it'll autoplay the song as well (and there's a nifty "play all" link as well). So far, wow. I don't know how to appreciate hip hop in all its diversity, and this guy's style definitely falls out of my previous knowledge.

He's a damn virtuoso! His voice and how he plays with it, the asyncopated rhythms, the lyrics with their powerful imagery and all the rage and the melody — it's explosive! This is a very dark album and I love the feelings and doubts it expresses; these are very real. Every song leaves me wanting to talk about it. Awesome.

Another display of how hip hop is definitely the rightful heir of rock music.

#86:  Author: Lucidity_Master PostPosted: Tue 01 Mar, 2011
    ----
Yea, Tech is about as good as anyone I have ever heard when it comes to rap/hip-hop, and he is incredibly versatile. He can speed rap, stacatco, tongue twisters, smooth, and sing pretty well. Plus his general style is infectious and fun to listen to.

I think one of the things I really love about the guy is that he does things his way. If you listen to his interviews he wants more than anything to be known worldwide and have massive success, but he won't take the easy way out with a major label record deal because he doesn't feel he would be able to make music thats true to him. He have to fake shit he isn't feeling and be constrained in the ways Tech wants to express himself. He does alot of his stuff based on what he is experiencing; KOD was made during a really tough time in his life when his mom was fighting all kinds of stuff, a friend had recently died, etc so the music was very dark and depressed cause thats what he was going through.



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