Does WILDS work for sure?
LD4all » Quest for Lucidity

#1: Does WILDS work for sure? Author: Up PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct, 2012
    ----
or can it go wrong? I mean like did WILD perfectly and didn't lucid dream..

<mod>Moved from General Lucidness. dragon</mod>

#2: Re: Does WILDS work for sure? Author: Shaper PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct, 2012
    ----
Up wrote:
or can it go wrong? I mean like did WILD perfectly and didn't lucid dream..


WILD does not refer to one specific method, it just means that you entered the dream and remained lucid directly from the waking state. This is in contrast to a DILD which is when you become lucid from something you did in the dream.

Just curious, which method did you use? You may just need more practice, or to try a different technique smile

#3:  Author: Antylamon PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct, 2012
    ----
One: Yes. Of course it can. No technique is foolproof. In addition, most people have to heavily personalize WILD to make it work at all.

Two: Please add more details about your history in LDing. For example, how good is your DR?

Three: Since you only have one previous LD, which I'm assuming wasn't induced with a technique, you're going too fast. Even though I've only been here a short while, I can already see a pattern for newcomers:

They found out about LDing in some way or another, looked it up, and became inspired to try it out.

They either used a DJ for a short period of time (a week, for example), or they skipped the DJ step entirely. Whichever one occurs, it's because they think something like this: "Meh, my DR is good enough. I want to skip to the exciting part!"

No newcomer that ever follows this pattern ever wants to try MILD or DILD... they skip straight into WILD, which looks like a bright, shining light. In reality, it's the hardest of all of them.

Once they realize they're not getting LDs within a few days to a week, they assume they cannot LD or that LDing is not worth the effort.

Please don't go down this path. LDing is a fantastic experience, but don't forget that NDs are fascinating as well. They're really the unsung heroes. Just think about how intriguing and deep they can be. Find the morals behind them and figure out what your SC is trying to tell you. And most of all, have fun with it.

This isn't meant to be a long, tedious journey. It's supposed to be an excitement at every turn. Watch yourself grow and improve. I couldn't remember any of my dreams at all for about half my life. Even the dreams I did remember from my early childhood were small glimpses. There was no point in time that I could ever remember more than that, until now. I'm even learning lessons from my dreams already.

Then again, I do consistently set my expectations lower. I constantly surprise myself due to that, but that's not the point. Savor what you have and you'll have a lot more motivation to go forward. That advice applies to life as a whole as well.

#4:  Author: Up PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct, 2012
    ----
I've been trying for a month now im not going to give up smile one problem is i don't GET how to do MILD any tips?

#5:  Author: Shaper PostPosted: Fri 19 Oct, 2012
    ----
Up wrote:
I've been trying for a month now im not going to give up smile one problem is i don't GET how to do MILD any tips?


The key thing to remember in MILD is the M, that is, the mnemonic. A mnemonic device is something that we use to remember to do something later. That's the point of MILD -- to remember to that you'll be dreaming, or to do something like RC when you're in a dream, in just a short while. Here's a quick review of MILD.

After you have awakened from a dream, lay still and remember the dream. Make sure that you also have some time to sleep a little longer, since you'll be going back to sleep soon. After you've remembered your dream (you may want to write it down before you go back to sleep), imagine that you are back in the dream. But this time focus your intention toward remembering to realize that you're dreaming. You can do this by imagining the dream you just had, only this time, imagine yourself noticing a dreamsign and becoming lucid. Then concentrate on a goal that you have in mind for your next lucid dream, and imagine yourself doing that. Do this until your intent is thoroughly fixed, or until you fall asleep. With any luck, you'll soon be back to sleep and dreaming, perhaps even in a very similar dream to the one you just had. Then, if it works, you'll remember that you're dreaming, or to perform a reality check. Then bingo! A lucid dream.



LD4all » Quest for Lucidity


Page 1 of 1
printed from the LD4all.com lucid dreaming forum. Content copyrighted by the author.
Lucid dreamers unite! visit LD4all.com